the three factors of symbolism.

spellcraft uses symbolism heavily to send a message into the universe in order to create change. generally, there are three levels of symbolism that you need to consider when designing a spell.

– you need a symbol or stand in to represent the subject of yours spells. its “target”

-you need a symbol of or stand in to represent the power you wish to bring to bare.

– and you need a symbol of or stand in of the change you wish the power to make.

physical objects can be used handily as symbols of the subject and the power. the final factor of change is usually accomplished through ritual action or some other gesture, though not always. though it can be handy to think of the factors like this, many workings don’t present them as 3 separate discreet steps. one can often be combined into another, and even repeated durring the process of casting.

of special note here are the use of works and incantation. spoken, written or sung words of power can act as a catalysts for the magic your wanting to work. speaking incantation while preparing your symbols or performing your ritual actions can turn those things from mundane things into the process by which magic is done. indeed, it can be phrased as “words of power make the thing magical.” while there are other forms of symbolism that can be employed to help deliver your intention, words are a handy tool that are easy to grasp and universal in application.

finally, is the issue of “placing” the spells. the final factor of a spell is often accomplished by placing the symbols used for the first two factors in close physical proximity to the spells subject. allowing physical closeness to establish a sympathetic link along which the magic can work. failing that, many spells will seek to hide the symbols in a place where they wont be disturbed, or even ritually destroyed and “released” into the elements by burning, burying, submerging or casting from a high place.

 

 

 

 

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